Testimonials from my peers, colleagues, friends, and fellow filmmakers.
Rated on a scale of 1 to 5 tall glasses of tap water.

"There is a big difference between photography and cinematography. Dante is one of the rare artists who excels at both. If that’s not enough reason to work with him, he also happens to be one of the smartest and funniest people I have ever met in this industry."  - Ernest Anemone, actor (www.ErnestAnemone.com)

"There is a big difference between photography and cinematography. Dante is one of the rare artists who excels at both. If that’s not enough reason to work with him, he also happens to be one of the smartest and funniest people I have ever met in this industry."  - Ernest Anemone, actor (www.ErnestAnemone.com)

"How does so much energy and talent fit into such a tiny boy?" - Annie Jaffe, Producer of Gayke Out

"How does so much energy and talent fit into such a tiny boy?" - Annie Jaffe, Producer of Gayke Out

"I remember looking at the story boards he worked on for my thesis film and thinking 'I’ve seen more detailed cave drawings,' but that’s all he needs to grasp the composition of a beautiful frame. He also tends to anthropomorphize animals, 'No Dante, birds do not think they are better than us because they can fly and sometimes poop on us.'  For someone’s who’s afraid of small holes and the chance of being falsely accused of murder (or wrists, whatever’s funnier), he is fearless with his camera. He likes to take risks, explore unique ways of framing a shot, which in turn makes the camera afraid of him." - Daniel Koski, director of Gayke Out

"I remember looking at the story boards he worked on for my thesis film and thinking 'I’ve seen more detailed cave drawings,' but that’s all he needs to grasp the composition of a beautiful frame. He also tends to anthropomorphize animals, 'No Dante, birds do not think they are better than us because they can fly and sometimes poop on us.' 

For someone’s who’s afraid of small holes and the chance of being falsely accused of murder (or wrists, whatever’s funnier), he is fearless with his camera. He likes to take risks, explore unique ways of framing a shot, which in turn makes the camera afraid of him." - Daniel Koski, director of Gayke Out